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Get ready for 2018 with the
Wild Nature Diary & Calendar

The wild landscapes of Britain are some of the most beautiful in the world. From the far North West Highlands and Islands of Scotland to the rugged sea cliffs of Cornwall are hidden corners of wildness, each with their own special creatures, plants and geology.

Yet these apparently unspoilt and natural landscapes are impacted everywhere by human occupation, overgrazing and blanket forestry. Positive action was called for in the face of this process of erosion and degradation and the John Muir Trust was formed in 1983, standing up for the wild land values pioneered by John Muir over a hundred years ago.

This website introduces those elements of land, nature, people and spirit that meant so much to him, and demonstrates that the natural world has a vital part to play in our lives through stewardship and preservation of ecosystems and natural resources.

The photographs within the pages of the Wild Nature Diary and the Wild Nature Calendar have been drawn from photographers with direct experience of encounters from the natural world in which we live. Each image tells its own inspiring story and helps us to connect with nature every day.

I hope you enjoy the scenes, textures and atmospheres of wild places throughout the year in the pages of the Wild Nature Diary 2018 and its companion Wild Nature Calendar 2018.

Photographers 2018

Adam Burton

Alex Hyde

Andrew Parkinson

Charles Everitt

Danny Green

Darryn Wade

Granville Harris

Ian Cameron

Jeanie Lazenby

Joanna Clegg

John Beatty

John Farrar

Karen Frenkel

Katherine Hallewell

Laurie Campbell

Lizzie Shepherd

Mark Hamblin

Michael Stirling-Aird

Michela Griffith

Neil McIntyre

Peter Cairns

Ross Brown

Sue Bishop

Photo of the Week

Roe deer Capreolus capreolus are native to Britain, having been here since before the Mesolithic period 6,000-10,000 years ago. They are browsers that select different food types including herbs, brambles, heather, bilberry and tree shoots. Browsing of tree shoots and agricultural crops puts them in conflict with farmers and foresters due to economic damage. Roe deer populations require careful management to maintain health and quality and to ensure a sustainable balance with their environment.

Photograph by Mark Hamblin

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